asker

misery47 asked: Hello! Would you mind giving a permission for translating your Mass Effect comics 'Blue Rose of Illium' into Russian? There's a big multi-fandom event in ru-fandom and ME-team would really be honored if you let us translate it :)

I’ll have to ask the Esc since they own the comic, but I don’t see any reason why they’d be against it. Mark that down as a tentative yes.

In the increasingly crowded indie market, developers are having to go the extra mile to make their games visually distinct – faux retro aesthetics just aren’t cutting it any more. Fledgling developer Nyamyam, has managed that first time around, judging by this absolutely gorgeous official trailer for the upcoming Tengami.

Due for release on iPad, PC and Mac in early 2013, Tengami is a point-and-click (or point-and-tap) adventure game presented in the form of a pop-up book. The game is based on a selection of Japan’s darker fairy tales and has players unfolding and rearranging its paper craft world to solve puzzles. The character animation is still a little rudimentary – though perhaps that’s part of the cutout animation aesthetic Nyamyam seems to be going for, but those area transitions are fantastic.

After being covered during the Gamescom 2012 Indie Spotlight, interest in Tengami has been picking up. It’s been nominated for the IndieCade 2012 awards alongside the likes of Analogue: A Hate Story, Botanicula and Dyad.

Nyamyam is made up of three ex-Rare employees; Philip Tossell, Ryo Agarie and Jennifer Schneidereit. Fellow former Rare employee, David Wise – whom many of you will recognize as the man responsible for one of the best level tracks in gaming history - is providing the game’s soundtrack.

A Little Bit on Sound Shapes’ Levels

 The following was dropped from a review of Sound Shapes that should be going live on the Escapist today. It’s just a little breakdown of the game’s various “albums.” It was left out because it’s a bit too specific for people who haven’t played the game and because the maximum word count is a limit, not a target. 

The game’s 20 levels are split into five different albums, six if you include the two level tutorial. While none of them  stray far from their platfomer routes, a number of the albums tackle different  platformer subgenres. Hello World and Beyonder, are relaxed affairs, more concerned with letting you explore their environments while you build relaxing “indietronica” tracks. D-Cade, with music by DeadMau5 and art by PixelJam, tests your platforming chops with hazardous 8-bit-styled challenges set to thumping techno. CORPOREAL, another collaboration between Superbrothers and Jim Guthrie, stands as my favorite album. Its levels play out like mini puzzle adventures set in an increasingly Kafkaesque corporate headquarters. They haven’t done anything especially imaginative with the game’s platforming, but there’s a ton of hidden animations and quirks to find. Bouncing on the heads of pixelated executives and making them drop their coffee is endlessly satisfying.

   The final album, Cities, contains three levels scored by the biggest name on the game’s soundtrack: Beck.  It’s an album that contains both the best and worst examples of the game’s core concept. The titular track, Cities, has you navigating through a burnt out city as jerky rockets beat out a rhythm and the song’s backing vocals become short-lived platforms. There’s a visual, musical and thematic connection between the music and the level design that none of the other levels quite match. It’s a shame it’s followed by Touch the People, a headache-inducing mess that has you dodging red bullets set against a sparkling green background while a track that sounds like somebody having a wrestling match with a broken sampler plays in the background.


  The Evangelion: 2.0 You Can (Not) Advance Blu-ray has been lurking around my house for a couple of months, but I only sat down and watched the thing last weekend.  That’s partially due to the fact I wasn’t entirely sure if the movies were necessary, or if Anno was just pulling a Lucas. The first movie was alright, it was nice to see what Anno could do given an actual budget and HD tech, but it didn’t deviate enough from the series, which has been re-mastered before, to keep me interested.     
 2.0 on the other hand, is fantastic.
 On the surface, it’s well-crafted reboot that “fixes” the series’ character arcs. Underneath the giant robot veneer, Neon Genesis Evangelion was a show about depression, and its characters reflected that. Most of the show’s major players suffered because they couldn’t see beyond their own misery. They couldn’t ask for help, nor help one another, and while that fits the theme of the show, it was immensely frustrating to watch. 
 But if the original series is about depression, then 2.0 is about recovery. The characters are still fundamentally broken people, but this time around they’re actively trying to make things better. Each character tries to fix themselves, and when that doesn’t work, they start trying to fix each other. It doesn’t work, of course. Fate throws a spanner into the works at the last moment. But it’s far more engaging, and heart-warming for fans of the old series, to see the characters fight against tragedy rather than bring it on themselves with inaction.  
 What’s really clever, however, is that the subtle implication that the movies aren’t reboots at all. End of Evangelion ended with Shinji rejecting instrumentality and deciding to take another shot at life with other people. The movies seem to depict that second chance. At the insistence of a friend I went hunting through the movie searching for those little clues Anno likes to leave and … well.
 The next movie can’t come soon enough

  The Evangelion: 2.0 You Can (Not) Advance Blu-ray has been lurking around my house for a couple of months, but I only sat down and watched the thing last weekend.  That’s partially due to the fact I wasn’t entirely sure if the movies were necessary, or if Anno was just pulling a Lucas. The first movie was alright, it was nice to see what Anno could do given an actual budget and HD tech, but it didn’t deviate enough from the series, which has been re-mastered before, to keep me interested.    

 2.0 on the other hand, is fantastic.

 On the surface, it’s well-crafted reboot that “fixes” the series’ character arcs. Underneath the giant robot veneer, Neon Genesis Evangelion was a show about depression, and its characters reflected that. Most of the show’s major players suffered because they couldn’t see beyond their own misery. They couldn’t ask for help, nor help one another, and while that fits the theme of the show, it was immensely frustrating to watch.

 But if the original series is about depression, then 2.0 is about recovery. The characters are still fundamentally broken people, but this time around they’re actively trying to make things better. Each character tries to fix themselves, and when that doesn’t work, they start trying to fix each other. It doesn’t work, of course. Fate throws a spanner into the works at the last moment. But it’s far more engaging, and heart-warming for fans of the old series, to see the characters fight against tragedy rather than bring it on themselves with inaction. 

 What’s really clever, however, is that the subtle implication that the movies aren’t reboots at all. End of Evangelion ended with Shinji rejecting instrumentality and deciding to take another shot at life with other people. The movies seem to depict that second chance. At the insistence of a friend I went hunting through the movie searching for those little clues Anno likes to leave and … well.

 The next movie can’t come soon enough

A couple of panels from page 4 of SLICE!
There’s a lot of panel placement jiggery going on in the pages we’ve done so far. One of the things I’ve noticed about webcomics is that they tend to have very regimented layouts. Now that’s great for humorous comics, as the regular panel layout gives strips an easy to follow “beat” and makes timing punchlines easier. But that same beat makes action scenes seem slow, measured or even boring. We might be going a bit overboard with the layouts in SLICE! but, since a lot of pages don’t have any dialogue, we need each layout to “pop.”
For a great example of shit-hot layout work. Check out this page from  Kazuo Koike and Kazuo Kamimura’s Lady Snowblood. Notice how the shape of the panels gives a direction to the white spaces between  (“gutters,” as they’re called) so that they resemble sword strokes? That’s fucking genius that is.

A couple of panels from page 4 of SLICE!

There’s a lot of panel placement jiggery going on in the pages we’ve done so far. One of the things I’ve noticed about webcomics is that they tend to have very regimented layouts. Now that’s great for humorous comics, as the regular panel layout gives strips an easy to follow “beat” and makes timing punchlines easier. But that same beat makes action scenes seem slow, measured or even boring. We might be going a bit overboard with the layouts in SLICE! but, since a lot of pages don’t have any dialogue, we need each layout to “pop.”

For a great example of shit-hot layout work. Check out this page from  Kazuo Koike and Kazuo Kamimura’s Lady Snowblood. Notice how the shape of the panels gives a direction to the white spaces between  (“gutters,” as they’re called) so that they resemble sword strokes? That’s fucking genius that is.

First page of SLICE! sans dialogue.

First page of SLICE! sans dialogue.

asker

Anonymous asked: is it me or does that last post of yours imply a Jade Empire comic?

It’s just you, I’m afraid.

So the response to Blue Rose of Illium has been great. I can’t promise that Henry and I will be doing any similar comics, but we are throwing a few ideas around. These are a few sketches from our tentative next project. No prizes for guessing which game it’s based on.

So the response to Blue Rose of Illium has been great. I can’t promise that Henry and I will be doing any similar comics, but we are throwing a few ideas around. These are a few sketches from our tentative next project. No prizes for guessing which game it’s based on.

The first page of Slice! Hosted here as part of our application to the Rampage Network.  The final page will be in full colour and will have… you know… words and stuff.

The first page of Slice! Hosted here as part of our application to the Rampage Network. The final page will be in full colour and will have… you know… words and stuff.

The first milestone in the Delivery Girl concept.
What I liked
The defined musculature of her shoulder implies upper body strength.
Her body is compact and strong, rather than skinny.
 The hat and socks are good. 
What I didn’t like
She’s too short and stubby, particularly around the legs, meaning she’ll look ridiculous next to the more reasonably proportioned characters and it’ll be hard to show how she moves.
Her eyes take up far too much of her face, which serves to infantilize her features rather than exaggerate them. 
The jeans are boring.
The sword is kind of weird, and the hilt texture is off.

The first milestone in the Delivery Girl concept.

What I liked

  • The defined musculature of her shoulder implies upper body strength.
  • Her body is compact and strong, rather than skinny.
  •  The hat and socks are good.

What I didn’t like

  • She’s too short and stubby, particularly around the legs, meaning she’ll look ridiculous next to the more reasonably proportioned characters and it’ll be hard to show how she moves.
  • Her eyes take up far too much of her face, which serves to infantilize her features rather than exaggerate them. 
  • The jeans are boring.
  • The sword is kind of weird, and the hilt texture is off.